Boating Glossary

AFT At, near or towards the stern of a vessel
BERTH
same as SLIP or a MOORING meaning a space where a vessel is moored.
BOAT FLARE
A flare is an aid to be lit when you get into trouble and you need to draw attention to be rescued or assisted. If you have multiple flares, fire one as soon as you are in trouble, then use the other flare at attract the searcher’s attention.Store in a watertight container with easy access. ORANGE HAND SMOKE DISTRESS FLARE *For DAY use Burn time 60 seconds, 3 year expiry date RED HANDHELD FLARE For day or NIGHT use. Bright red magnesium light. Burn time 60 seconds
BOW
The front of the boat, the end that is pointed
BOWLINE KNOT
A reliable knot to tie a mooring line from a boat to a post
CHANDLERY
A shop that sells boat related goods
CLOVE HITCH KNOT or Clove Hitch End
It slips and it also binds. It shouldn’t be trusted when used by itself. Used initially to attach boat fenders to a rail, but usually with two Half Hitches added. Used to attach tent ropes to ground stakes. Not used to secure a boat to a mooring. VARIATIONS: Clove Hitch Loop, Clove Hitch Using Half Hitches MANTRA: Over the Top, Around the Back, Over the Top again, Under and Through
DEPTH OF WATER

DOUBLE MOORING same as TWIN MOORING and FORE and AFT MOORING means a pair of swing moorings, allows for denser mooring of vessels. A dinghy is required to access your vessel.DRY STACK Under cover storage on land for your vessel. Less exposure to the elements for the hull and engine
EBB TIDE is a tide that is going out.
EPIRB (Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons), or emergency distress beacon is an essential piece of equipment when considering blue water cruising, sailing between countries on an open sea. Some activate when hitting water but others engage with the press of a button. And with luck you will be rescued within 24 hours. You do not press this button when you cannot find the cork screw and are in need of kitchen aid, you press this when your engine dies in the middle of the sea  and/or your mast has broken or you have a medical emergency. It is a beacon of last resort. EPRIBs must be registered to give the best information to the coastguard. Emergency contact information and the description of boat, number of people on board, whether there is a life raft on board. If registered the coastguard can contact the designated person and verify whether or not the distress is real or just a false alarm for starters. A 406 MHz EPIRB is one of the requirements for Category 1 NZ registered boats wishing to leave NZ waters to other parts of the world.
FIGURE EIGHT KNOT, also known as the Figure of Eight Knot, Flemish Knot, Savoy Knot, Double Stopper. A Stopper knot. To prevent a rope from sliding through a lead or a block/pulley. Often seen at the end of a jib sheet in sailing.  For tying the hook length to the end of your mainline in fishing. An alert to let you know the the end of the rope is near. To stop your rope from unraveling. Easy to untie. VARIATIONS: Figure Eight On a Bight, Figure Eight Follow Through, In Line Figure Eight, Figure Eight Double Loop, Directional Figure Eight. MANTRA: Over, Under, Over, Through
FLOOD TIDE A tide that is coming in.
FORE At, near or towards the bow of a vessel.
FORE and AFT MOORING DOUBLE MOORING or TWIN MOORING and means a pair of swing moorings, allows for denser mooring of vessels. A dinghy is required to access your vessel.
GALE AVERAGE winds exceeding 33 KNOTS
GUNWALE The top edge of the side of the boat. This is where the guns were mounted in old warships.
HARD STAND Cradle/storage for your vessel on land, usually for short term for maintenance/repairs
HEAD Marine toilet
HEAVING TO (to heave to and to be hove to) is a way of slowing a sail boat’s forward progress, as well as fixing the helm and sail positions so that the boat does not actively have to be steered. It is commonly used for a “break”; this may be to wait for the tide before proceeding, to wait out a strong or contrary wind. For a solo or shorthanded sailor it can provide time to go below deck, to attend to issues elsewhere on the boat, or for example to take a lunch break.
HOLDING TANK A container for holding sewage on a boat that has a head ( marine toilet).
LOA (LENGTH OVERALL) The length of the boat from bow to stern INCLUDING the anchor and the diving platform and the dinghy holder.
LWL (LOAD WATERLINE LENGTH or WATERLINE LENGTH) The length of the boat when sitting in water, this will vary depending on the weather conditions, the load and the speed the vessel travels.
MARINA BERTH A mooring where the vessel is tied to a pier. Sometimes there is a finger pier along one side the vessel. A finger pier is a smaller pier connecting a larger pier. Vessel can come without finger, one finger or finger piers on both sides of the vessel (rare).
MOORING A space where a vessel is moored, or place where you tie your boat
NEAP TIDE is caused in the last quarter and the first quarter (half moons)  This is when the sun and the moon are separated by a 90 degree angle when viewed from earth. The tides are less extreme.
ORANGE HAND SMOKE DISTRESS FLARE *For DAY use Burn time 60 seconds, 3 year expiry date, see BOAT FLARE
PFD (PERSONAL FLOTATION DEVICE) A life jacket or flotation jacket that you wear when on a boat in rough conditions. Must be worn over clothing as the outer layer to be effective. Children 16 years and under and non swimmers should wear a life jacket at all times regardless of the weather conditions
PILE MOORING A mooring where the vessel is tied to wooden pole or post, common only in New Zealand. A dinghy is required to access your vessel.
PORT The left hand side of the boat as you look towards the bow (front)
PORTHOLE  A hinged window on a boat that lets in light and air
PORTLIGHT A window on a boat that does not open
RED HANDHELD FLARE For day or NIGHT use. Bright red magnesium light. Burn time 60 seconds see BOAT FLARE
REEF KNOT also known as the Square Knot, To bind ropes of the same size. “A reef knot is safe when under constant tension but may tend to slip on synthetic rope.” It slips, it comes undone, it jams. Never to be used when safety is critical. Used to tie a sail cover over a sail. MANTRA: Left Over Right, then Right Over Left
SEACOCK  A value on the hull of the boat allowing water/liquid to flow into/out of your boat. It is always above the waterline. A seacock is used for a saltwater faucet, toilet, water coolant for the engine. When in port the seacock for the saltwater faucet may be manually opened and then closed when going to sea. Water can enter the boat through a seacock that should be closed in rough seas.
SIMPLE MOORING SWING MOORING: same as SINGLE POINT MOORING meaning a mooring with a single anchoring system for a vessel. The vessel will swing around with the movement of the tide and wind. A dinghy is required to access your vessel
SINGLE POINT MOORING, SWING MOORING or SIMPLE MOORING meaning a mooring with a single anchoring system for a vessel. The vessel will swing around with the movement of the tide and wind. A dinghy is required to access your vessel
SLIP same as BERTH or a MOORING meaning a space where a vessel is moored
SQUALL  shower clouds,possibilty of a sudden brief GALE
SPRING TIDE A full moon and a new moon makes a SPRING TIDE. This is when the sun, the earth and the moon are alined and the high tides are higher than normal and the low tides are lower than normal. Add this with SUNSET or SUNRISE then you get a higher chance of catching fish.
STARBOARD The right hand side of the boat as you look towards the bow (front)
STERN The back of the boat, the end that is widest
SUNGLASSES A must item to wear to reduce glare and improve visibility on the water
SUNSCREEN Being in the sun all day means applying sunscreen lotion on your skin multiple times a day to avoid getting sunburnt.
SURVIVAL FLOAT If you happen to find yourself in the water without a flotation device/life jacket then the best way of floating while in rough, open water is the survival float or the face down float. This style of floating allows you to conserve your energy so you can stay in the water for longer.
SWING MOORING: same as SINGLE POINT MOORING, or SIMPLE MOORING meaning a mooring with a single anchoring system for a vessel. The vessel will swing around with the movement of the tide and wind. A dinghy is required to access your vessel
TENDER The small boat that could be a dinghy that is partnered with a larger vessel. You would use a tender to row to shore from your anchored vessel.
TRANSOM The flat part of the bow. Sometimes there is a gate in the transom, sometimes there is a spare motor attached to the transom.
TIDAL STREAM is the horizontal movement of the sea when it moves from high to low water areas and back again. Tidal streams in a narrow channel cause the tide to move faster. This can be dangerous for small boats especially when the wind is blowing against the tide. A North Tidal Stream flows NORTH.
TWIN MOORING DOUBLE MOORING same as and FORE and AFT MOORING means a pair of swing moorings, allows for denser mooring of vessels. A dinghy is required to access your vessel.
WAKE The wave caused by a boat travelling through the water. If the boat is big and moving fast then the wake will be larger than if it were moving slower. A speed of 5 knots in marinas is so that the boats are not affected by wakes.

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